Muslim Villa

Category 5 => Commentary / Tafsir of specific Quranic Verses or Quran topics with detailed discussions => Topic started by: Zeynab on February 27, 2010, 05:03:13 am



Title: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on February 27, 2010, 05:03:13 am
 BismEm


Many of our disrespectful ulemas and their naive disciples often claim that the Noble Quran says little or nothing about the methods of performing Hajj, and if it wasn't for the Hadith, we would not know how to perform Hajj today.  Needless to say, this couldn't be farther from the truth. 

Please carefully read the following information with the complete set of Quranic verses elucidating every important ritual of Hajj.

The Quran does not mention the visit to al-Medinah during Hajj.  That has been added later since Medinah was the home of the Prophet (SAAW) during the last 10 years of his life.  Thus, visiting Medinah is optional, not obligatory during Hajj.
 

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Quranic Verses on Hajj and its method

And when We made the House (at Mecca) a resort for mankind and a sanctuary, (saying): Take as your place of worship the place where Abraham {Ibrahim} {Ibrahim} stood (to pray). And We imposed a duty upon Abraham {Ibrahim} {Ibrahim} and Ishmael {Isma`il) {Isma`il), (saying): Purify My house for those who go around and those who meditate therein and those who bow down and prostrate themselves (in worship)  2:125  Al-Baqrah

Lo! (the mountains) Al-Safa and Al-Marwah are among the indications of Allah. It is therefore no sin for him who is on pilgrimage to the House (of God) or visits it, to go around them (as the pagan custom is). And he who does good of his own accord (for him), Lo! Allah is Responsive {Ash-Shakir}, Aware {Al-`Alim}   2:158  Al-Baqrah

The pilgrimage is (in) the well known months,*  and whoever is minded to perform the pilgrimage therein (let him remember that) there is (to be) no lewdness nor abuse nor angry conversation on the pilgrimage. And whatsoever good you do Allah knows it. So make provision for yourselves (here after); for the best provision is to ward off evil. Therefore keep your duty unto Me, O men of understanding    2:197  Al-Baqrah


* some explain this by presuming that hajj can be performed in Zil Hajj and certain other months too, most likely Muharram, Safar and Rajab.  But we cannot confirm this.  The confirmed month for Hajj can only be taken as Zil Hajj.

It is no sin for you that you seek the bounty of your Lord (by trading). But, when you press on in the multitude from Arafat, remember Allah by the sacred monument. Remember Him as He has guided you, although before you were of those astray  2:198  Al-Baqrah

Then hasten onward from the place whence the multitude hastens onward, and ask forgiveness of Allah. Lo! Allah is Forgiving, Merciful  2:199  Al-Baqrah

Remember Allah through the appointed days. Then whoso hastens (his departure) by two days, it is no sin for him, and whoso delays, it is no sin for him; that is for him who wards off (evil). Be careful of your duty to Allah, and know that unto Him you will be gathered  2:203  Al-Baqrah


Some interpreters explain this verse 2:203 as reference to Mina.  But only Allah knows best.  Since the visit to Mina has not been mentioned in the Quran, therefore it cannot be considered obligatory.

Lo! the first Sanctuary appointed for mankind was that at Mecca, a blessed place, a guidance to the peoples

Wherein are plain memorials (of Allah's guidance); the place where Abraham {Ibrahim} stood up to pray; and whosoever enters it is safe. And pilgrimage to the House is a duty unto Allah for mankind, for him who can find a way thither. As for him who disbelieves, (let him know that) Lo! Allah is Independent of (all) creatures.  3:96-97  Al Imran

.... game being unlawful when you are on pilgrimage. Lo! Allah ordains that which pleases Him. 5:1  Al Maidah

O you who believe! Kill no wild game while you are on the pilgrimage. Whoso of you kills it of set purpose he shall pay its forfeit in the equivalent of that which he has killed, of domestic animals, the judge to be two men among you known for justice; (the forfeit) to be brought as an offering to the Ka'bah; or, for expiation, he shall feed poor persons, or the equivalent thereof in fasting, that he may taste the evil consequences of his deed. Allah forgives whatever (of this kind) may have happened in the past, but whoso relapses, Allah will take retribution from him. Allah is Mighty, Able to Requite (the wrong).  5:95  Al Maidah

To hunt and to eat the fish of the sea is made lawful for you, a provision for you and for seafarers; but to hunt on land is forbidden you so long as you are on the pilgrimage. Be mindful of your duty to Allah, unto Whom you will be gathered.  5:96  Al Maidah


 
Verses from Surah Al Hajj

And (remember) when We prepared for Abraham {Ibrahim} the place of the (holy) House, saying: Ascribe you no thing as partner unto Me, and purify My House for those who make the round (thereof) and those who stand and those who bow and make prostration.  22:26 Al-Hajj

And proclaim unto humankind the Pilgrimage. They will come unto you on foot and on every lean camel; they will come from every deep ravine:  22:27  Al Hajj

That they may witness things that are of benefit to them, and mention the name of Allah on appointed days over the beast of cattle that He has bestowed upon them. Then eat thereof and feed therewith the poor unfortunate.  22:28  Al-Hajj

Then let them make an end of their unkemptness and pay their vows and go around the ancient House.  22:29  Al-Hajj

That (is the command). And whoso magnifies the sacred things of Allah, it will be well for him in the sight of his Lord. The cattle are lawful unto you save that which has been told you. So shun the filth of idols, and shun lying speech:  22:30  Al-Hajj

Turning unto Allah (only), not ascribing partners unto Him; for whoso ascribes partners unto Allah, it is as if he had fallen from the sky and the birds had snatched him or the wind had blown him to a far off place.  22:31  Al-Hajj

And the camels! We have appointed them among the ceremonies of Allah. Therein you have much good. So mention the name of Allah over them when they are drawn up in lines. Then when their flanks fall (dead), eat thereof and feed the beggar and the suppliant. Thus have We made them subject unto you, that haply {by chance} you may give thanks.  22:36  Al Hajj

Their flesh and their blood reach not Allah, but the devotion from you reaches Him. Thus have We made them subject unto you that you may magnify Allah that He has guided you. And give good tidings (O Muhammad) to the good.  22:37  Al Hajj


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Briefly, all of the above verses give the following information on the performance of Hajj:

The Kaa'ba was a first place for worship since the time of Prophet Abraham (pbuh).  And Hajj is obligatory for those who can manage it.  Ref. V. 3:96-97
 
V. 2:125 refers to the Taw'af, I'tekaf, ruku and prostration. 

Visiting Safa and Marwa  - V.2:158

"there is (to be) no lewdness nor abuse nor angry conversation on the pilgrimage."  2:197

Going to Arafat  ..... "when you press on in the multitude from Arafat, remember Allah by the sacred monument."  2:198   In continuation also refer to verses 2:199 and 2:203.

Hunting is not allowed while on Pilgrimage - ref. V.5:1    And the penalty for breaking this law - ref. V.5:95.   Fishing is lawful while on Pilgrimage - ref. V. 5:96.

Coming to the verses of Surah Al-Hajj (Chapter 22):

V. 22:26 refers to purifying the House of Allah, the Kaa'bah, with Taw'af, ruku and sajood.

V, 22:27 reference - people will come to perform Hajj (pilgrimage) from far and wide.

V. 22:28 mentions as one of the benefits of Hajj is for believers to see (or witness) the important landmarks.  Also, about sacrificing an animal by mentioning the name of Allah.

V. 22:29 - reference is to tidying up oneself at the end of the Pilgrimage, which is when Muslims shave their heads (for men).

Vs. 22:30-31 - reference throughout is praising Allah and the sacred monuments and never forgetting the strict observance of Monotheism.

V. 22:36 reference - sacrifice of camels is permitted.  Sacrificial meat to be eaten by pilgrims and distributed to the poor.

V. 22:37 clearly expresses the huge importance of one's intent, that is, devotion to Allah.  This is the foundation of every act during Pilgrimage including the practice of sacrificing an animal for food.


In conclusion, with such a huge bunch of information contained within the Noble Quran on how to perform Pilgrimage, if someone still considers that Hadith teaches us the performance of Hajj, the problem is surely with the limited minds of such persons.


Also please read:

The Quran mentions everything necessary about the method of Salaah
http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=2302.msg6405#msg6405

Quran on Zakah
http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=2309.0

What does the Quran say about Fasting?
http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=2419.msg6760#msg6760


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on February 27, 2010, 05:09:12 am
Furthermore, also please read our post
History of Hajj (http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=2259.0), for a still better understanding of this topic.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on August 15, 2015, 02:31:36 am
As the last month of our Hijri calendar, Zil-Hajj 1436, approaches, may Allah Almighty accept the Hajj of those believers who go to perform it with a sincere intent. Ameen.  According to Christian calendar Hajj will be between September 20 and 25, 2015.


The image below of the Kaa'ba, it's not only during Hajj but all year round.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/8b/4b/5e/8b4b5e0e51a2a32e8ec9d6c3f3bf10f7.jpg)


And the Day of Arafah, 9th day of Hajj
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/f5/4e/c6/f54ec66d14364b2706120cc332d21a1a.jpg)


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on August 15, 2015, 02:34:41 am
Ameen, ameen.  Very thoughtful message brother ts.  Is anyone going from your family this year?


 Indeed worship of Allah, The Almighty, is for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in Makkah.  Alhumdulilah a million times.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on August 15, 2015, 02:37:07 am
.... brother ts.  Is anyone going from your family this year?


No sister ... almost everyone in my immediate and close extended family have performed Hajj.  Most of us have also done Umrah.  Just a few younger ones below 18 haven't.  But InshAllah will within a few years.


And yeah Sister, that image and its caption is great.  Found it on Tumblr, I think.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on August 15, 2015, 02:42:00 am
InshAllah, ameen.  Btw, I so much agree with your emphasis on the expression "with a sincere intent."  Like everything else, with a lot of people Hajj has become more of a status symbol rather than a mandatory worship exclusively for the benefit of each soul.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on August 15, 2015, 02:46:10 am
Like everything else, with a lot of people Hajj has become more of a status symbol rather than a mandatory worship exclusively for the benefit of each soul.

That's exactly what I meant.  Many who claim to be 'Muslims' have this attitude.  The last thought they have in their mind while traveling for Hajj is of Allah.  Even before commencing their journey for Hajj, plans are underway on how Hajj will be celebrated after they return by throwing dinner parties.  Isn't it pathetic?
 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on August 15, 2015, 03:08:46 am
Ameen.

Thank you for the message br. TS.  Love both images, Kaa'ba and Mount Arafah.  All praise be to Allah.

You guys are so correct.  There's no dearth of materialistic jahils in this world who call themselves "Muslims."  They forget that Hajj is between Allah and them.  Instead their materialism makes it a thing between the society and them.  Very, very pathetic indeed. 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on August 15, 2015, 03:23:14 am
Exactly Sis.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 22, 2016, 05:59:33 am
As-Salam Alaykum everyone.

There's a very relevant point mentioned in Quran-alone site "Quran-Islam.org-True Islam" (http://www.quran-islam.org/main_topics/islam/pillars/al-hajj_(P1195).html) which needs to be discussed.   I thought of continuing in this thread so all info on Hajj can be found under a single thread for the convenience of our readers.

Original of Verse 9:36 in Arabic:

إِنَّ عِدَّةَ الشُّهُورِ عِنْدَ اللَّهِ اثْنَا عَشَرَ شَهْرًا فِي كِتَابِ اللَّهِ يَوْمَ خَلَقَ السَّمَاوَاتِ وَالْأَرْضَ مِنْهَا أَرْبَعَةٌ حُرُمٌ ۚ ذَٰلِكَ الدِّينُ الْقَيِّمُ ۚ فَلَا تَظْلِمُوا فِيهِنَّ أَنْفُسَكُمْ ۚ وَقَاتِلُوا الْمُشْرِكِينَ كَافَّةً كَمَا يُقَاتِلُونَكُمْ كَافَّةً ۚ وَاعْلَمُوا أَنَّ اللَّهَ مَعَ الْمُتَّقِينَ

"Indeed, the number of months with Allah is twelve [lunar] months in the register of Allah [from] the day He created the heavens and the earth; of these, four are sacred. That is the correct religion, so do not wrong yourselves during them. And fight against the disbelievers collectively as they fight against you collectively. And know that Allah is with the righteous [who fear Him]."  (Verse 9:36)

In Verse 9:36 the word on focus is "hurum" or "hurumun."   According to Quran-alone site the meaning of "humum" is not 'sacred' as translated by all translators including Haleem.  They claim "hurum" is the plural of "haram" and in Verse 9:36 the word implies "to abstain."  Thus the explanation goes as, there are 12 months in a year out of which 4 months are for abstinence from wars, unless in self defense.

Then comes Verse 2:197 where another point needs to be viewed.

Original of Verse 2:197 in Arabic:

الْحَجُّ أَشْهُرٌ مَعْلُومَاتٌ ۚ فَمَنْ فَرَضَ فِيهِنَّ الْحَجَّ فَلَا رَفَثَ وَلَا فُسُوقَ وَلَا جِدَالَ فِي الْحَجِّ ۗ وَمَا تَفْعَلُوا مِنْ خَيْرٍ يَعْلَمْهُ اللَّهُ ۗ وَتَزَوَّدُوا فَإِنَّ خَيْرَ الزَّادِ التَّقْوَىٰ ۚ وَاتَّقُونِ يَا أُولِي الْأَلْبَابِ

"The pilgrimage takes place during the prescribed months.
There should be no indecent speech, misbehaviour, or quarrelling
for anyone undertaking the pilgrimage– whatever good you do, God
is well aware of it." (2:197)  (translation Haleem)

"(For) the Hajj (are) months well known, ...... "    (2:197)  (translation Corpus Quran)


In this Verse 2:197 we need to focus on the word "months" which is plural in both translations above.  It's original in Arabic of Verse 2:197 would be "ashhurun."  We can be sure "ashhurun" is plural as grammatically Corpus Quran defines it as "nominative masculine plural indefinite noun."  The reason why the Quran mentions "months"and not 'month' is because there are 4 months that are "hurum" as already studied in Verse 9:36.

Therefore according to Quran-Islam.org., it's not necessary to restrict Hajj only during the month of Zil Hajj, rather it can be performed during any of those 4 months. Contrary to that, our jurists have ruled Hajj to be performed only in month of Zil Hajj and that too, not the whole month of Zil Hajj but just the first 10 days.  According to this website, the concept of only Zil Hajj as the month of pilgrimage, and that too the first 10 days, comes from the Hadith institution.  The website also clarifies that these 4 months aren't defined as "sacred" in the Quran, rather they are defined as months of 'abstinence' (that is, abstinence from war).

Those folks sound Quranically correct.  I personally think so.  Please give me your feedback.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on November 23, 2016, 04:59:12 am
Walaikum As-salam brother TS.  I really found this interesting.

I'm not sure if the word "hurum" or "hurumun" in Verse 9:36 means precisely abstinence as stated by that website.  However, I think that's not relevant.  If Allah tells us to abstain from war on certain months, obviously there is a purpose for it.  But the names of those months are not given in the Quran.   However, their interpretation of Verse 2:197 definitely makes plenty of sense.  Allah does refer to Hajj on prescribed "months"  ... not month.  But the issue here is that we don't know which months are included in those 4 months except from Hadith sources.  The concept of 4 sacred (or hurum) months of Zil Qadah, Zil Hajjah, Muharram and Rajab comes from a Bukhari Hadith which I quote as follows:-

O People! Time has gone back to how it was at the time Allah created the Heavens and the Earth. A year has twelve months, four of which are sacred, three consecutive, Thul-Qi’dah, Thul-Hijjah, Muharram, and Rajab, which comes between Jumaadaa and Sha’baan.” (Al-Bukhaari).

Pilgrimage (Hajj) in the month of Zil Hijjah is definite as the name of the month itself is an indication of that.  It's also possible that the practice of pilgrimage during Zil Hajj began when the Monotheistic Faith prevailed in Arabia as preached by Prophets Abraham and his son Ishmael (peace be on them).  Then, the practice of pagan pilgrimage in the month of Zil Hajj continued even after the Arabs gradually corrupted the Monotheistic Faith.  This is a possibility according to which one can presume that Zil Hajj as the month for Hajj began from the time of Prophet Abraham.  This is only an opinion.  But which other months are sacred or hurum whence to abstain from war is only known to Allah.  As you know, Bukhari as well as all other Hadith collections are so tainted that I cannot be 100% certain that the names of the 4 months stated in the Bukhari Hadith quoted above are really the same which Allah refers to in Verse 2:197 as "prescribed months."  Yet, that website's view point remains pretty much valid.  Since Allah does mention "months" for Hajj, therefore whatever information we have at present regarding the sacred months for abstaining from war can be viewed as the right months for Hajj as well.  This is based on the information given by the Divine Power in Verses 2:197 as well as 9:36 of four special months when Hajj can be performed.  We can only hope that the traditionalist view naming those four months (as they have) is correct.  We really have no other way of verifying that.  If this Bukhari hadith is discrepant, which is of course possible, the responsibility to answer to Allah will be on Bukhari's head.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on November 23, 2016, 05:15:43 am
I agree with Quran-Islam.org website that the concept of Hajj only during first 10 days of month of Zil Hajj is from traditions.  The Quran does not uphold that.  So we can perform Hajj on all 4 months.  That much is in accordance with the Quran as confirmed in the Final Message.  But the question is which are those other 3 months as Sister Heba emphasized?  If we choose those additional 3 sacred or abstained months as Zil Qadah, Muharram and Rajab .. then again we are going back to Hadith, aren't we?  Because this information comes from Hadith.  Unless that website has some logical analysis from the Quran as to which months are precisely included from the Quranic statement of Verse 2:197.  But I'm sure the Quran does not mention the names of those months.  The only month named in the Quran is Ramadan, that the Quran began being revealed in this month because Allah wants us to know about it.

The Quran refers to the cycle of time-period from the beginning of times, and thus the Quran does not mention the names of months because names of months have been different in different communities around the world at different times of history.  Not just that, but with the cycle of cultural innovation, those names also kept changing.

As for the precise reason for selecting specific months and why these 4 months were chosen as sacred which mainly denoted abstinence from violence, is not known either.  Possibly the purpose was to minimize the anxiety and destruction of war .. to give a break to the strife & skirmishes within a tribal community.  It maybe possible that the practice of refraining from wars on certain months existed in Arabia since very long, maybe it existed in some ways since the time of Prophet Abraham (pbuh).  But only Allah knows best.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 23, 2016, 05:21:22 am
Very grateful for your answers sisters.  Thank you for taking the time with so much reflection and thoughts.  Allah bless.

So, that means we may presume Zil Qadah, Zil Hajj, Muharam and Rajab as the 4 special months?


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on November 23, 2016, 05:28:36 am
I suppose so brother.  And this can be based on Sister Zeynab's analysis presuming that these 4 months came from the time of Prophets Abraham and Ishmael (pbt). And since the people of Arabia already knew which months they were, so the Quran did not mention them.  Well, actually, the confirmation of Zil-Hajj comes from the name of the month.  What isn't confirmed is whether Zil-Qadah, Muharram and Rajab are the other 3 months referred as sacred in Allah's Final Message.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 23, 2016, 05:32:07 am
Right.  Thus, what might be the right conclusion?  Should we be able to perform Hajj in all of those 4 months or only in Zil-Hajj?


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on November 23, 2016, 05:41:16 am
Exactly brother.  I think it can be taken as a subjective issue.  Some Quran-alone followers might want to trust the traditional information on the names of the months and decide to perform Hajj during any of them, because after all the Quran mentions "months" for Hajj and not month.  But if you ask me personally, with my distrust for Hadith, I would prefer pilgrimage only during Zil-Hajj.  Though tradition also mentions to perform Hajj only on month of Zil-Hajj, my reason is not that.  I prefer to stick to Zil-Hajj on the safer side .. because the Quran does not mention the names of the other 3 months.  However, I would view the entire month of Zil-Hajj as valid for pilgrimage, not just the first 10 days because the Quran also gives no reasons to conclude that only 10 days of Zil-Hajj are allowed for pilgrimage.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 23, 2016, 05:45:20 am
Alhumdulilah.  Many thanks Sister.  Perfectly clear.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on November 23, 2016, 05:47:54 am
Exactly brother.  I think it can be taken as a subjective issue.  Some Quran-alone followers might want to trust the traditional information on the names of the months and decide to perform Hajj during any of them, because after all the Quran mentions "months" for Hajj and not month.  But if you ask me personally, with my distrust for Hadith, I would prefer pilgrimage only during Zil-Hajj.  Though tradition also mentions to perform Hajj only on month of Zil-Hajj, my reason is not that.  I prefer to stick to Zil-Hajj on the safer side .. because the Quran does not mention the names of the other 3 months.  However, I would view the entire month of Zil-Hajj as valid for pilgrimage, not just the first 10 days because the Quran also gives no reasons to conclude that only 10 days of Zil-Hajj are allowed for pilgrimage.

SubhanAllah.   I couldn't agree more.  Allah bless.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on November 23, 2016, 05:50:07 am
You're welcomed dear sister and brother  :)


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on November 24, 2016, 09:49:08 am
Salams dear sisters and brother.  I loved this thread.  "They say New York never sleeps, they haven't seen Mekkah yet."  LOL, so true!  And that excellent point br. TS brought up on Hajj where the Quran mentions "months" not month.  Sis Heba's conclusion was safest. 

The other point I want to ask is about Ihram.  Of course we know it's only for men.  How far is it Quranic?  I don't know of any references of wearing Ihram for Hajj in the Quran.  Obviously, both men and women must be modestly dressed as Allah has commanded they must at all times.  So how did the idea of Ihram come about?


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on November 24, 2016, 10:10:19 am
Wa'salaam dear Sister Ruhi.  You're right.  While it's absolutely essential to be properly covered - for both men and women - in accordance to the rules of modesty already elucidated in the Quran, 'Ihram' (dress code for men) is a purely traditional and senseless thing never mentioned in the Quran.  Actually the literal meaning of the word Ihram alludes to abstaining.  In Arabic it means abstention.  According to traditional information, men require to wear two seamless white wrappings during Hajj; one worn around the waist and the other wrapped over the shoulder. This garment is supposed to be part of the state of Ihram during Hajj.  Probably symbolic of abstaining from fancy garments.  However, the point is, the list of requirements for ‘Ihram’ or abstention is given in the Quran, and it does not include this clothing for men. The abstentions mentioned in the Quran during Hajj are abstentions from war, hunting, sex, cutting one’s hair (head to be shaven at the end of Hajj), misconduct and arguments.  Thus, "Ihram" referring to the white wrapping is not a Quranic law.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 24, 2016, 10:20:04 am
Right on Sister Zeynab.  That's precisely it.  Moreover I've also heard people say that the Ihram wrapping is supposed to represent the white shroud as the wrappings must be seamless, no tailor stitches, not even a safety pin to tie the wrappings together.  But the Quran does not mention any such concepts. 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on November 24, 2016, 10:28:28 am
Yes brother, I also heard one of my uncles say this ..... that it's a representation of the shroud.  But Hajj is for worshiping Allah, for reminding us of the Hereafter and cleansing ourselves of our sins with the realization of not repeating them.  The idea of putting on a garment resembling a shroud is quite unconnected with Hajj. As you said, the Quran makes no such references at all.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on November 24, 2016, 10:30:28 am
True sister ....


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on November 24, 2016, 10:40:16 am
Plenty of thanks for the useful info dear sister and brother.  These are the points I had in mind too and needed a confirmation from you folks. 

In fact, the carelessness with which many men wrap the Ihram often looks  indecent with large parts of their hairy chests and backs showing.  This is NOT modesty and believing men must not be dressed as such any time, let alone at the time of worshiping Allah.

Wrapping the unstitched shroud around the dead is something different.  A dead person does not move around so the shroud stays intact.  But that doesn't mean those who're living must wear it .... and during Hajj one is constantly walking and moving about.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on November 24, 2016, 10:42:19 am
Yes, correct Sister Ruhi.  That too is a very logical point. 

You're welcomed Sister.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on August 24, 2017, 02:19:40 am
Time flies.   End August 2017 and we are going through the 10 days of the month of Hajj.  Day of Arafah is on August 31.  Hajj will culminate on September 1 with pilgrims required to sacrifice an animal for charitable purposes or donate its equivalent in cash.  A non-Quranic celebration by the Muslim world on the 10th day of Hajj is Eid-al-Adha requiring the sacrifice of animal as charity.  Unfortunately very little goes to charity.  Mostly this tradition denotes sumptuous lunches or dinners among the well-to-do.   If you observe Eid-al-Azha truly for purposes of charity, it's fine - either sacrificing an animal or giving the equivalent in cash to the needy.  Secondly, on the day of Arafah (9th day of Hajj) our jurists say fasting is recommended for those not performing Hajj.  If you're not performing Hajj and you find solace in fasting on 9th of Hajj, do so by all means.  However, it's not obligatory and not a Quranic requirement like fasting in Ramadan.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on August 28, 2017, 11:53:07 am
Thank you brother.  I think fasting on Day of Arafah is a very good idea.  Yes, it's not in the Quran but extra worship on a day like this .. particularly if one is not able to perform Hajj ... is always a benefit for the soul which Allah Almighty will take into account, if He wills.  Alhumdulilah.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on August 31, 2017, 07:06:46 am


(http://i.imgur.com/5JZuIvZ.jpg)

 rdht rdht rdht rdht

Yeah brother, sister, I'm fasting today .. Youm-e-Arafat.  Not obligatory but a nice day to refresh and awaken your soul with fasting.  Some charity to the needy (if one can afford) would brighten the event.  May Allah Almighty accept.  Ameen ya Rab-al-Alameen. Ameen.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on August 31, 2017, 07:09:17 am
Wowie!  The City that never sleeps.  SubhanAllah again and again.   Me too fasting.  Ya Allah, accept our efforts.   Ameen.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on August 31, 2017, 07:13:54 am
Many thanks for the excellent reminder Br. TS and thanks for the gorgeous Kaa'ba pic.  Just beautiful.   May Allah grant those an opportunity for this journey of a lifetime to those who haven't yet been fortunate enough to experience it.  My husband is fasting but not me as I'm down with a terrible cold.  But will InshAllah offer nauafil.  Also please pray that Makkah and Medinah are liberated from the occupation of a takfiri wahabi regime. 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on August 31, 2017, 07:16:49 am
You're welcomed sis.  InshAllah hope you recover fast from the cold.  Weather is changing.  Take care dear sis.

.... Also please pray that Makkah and Medinah are liberated from the occupation of a takfiri wahabi regime. 


Ameen, ameen.  Very important dua ......


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on August 31, 2017, 07:23:55 am
...  InshAllah hope you recover fast from the cold.  Weather is changing.  Take care dear sis.

Aw, thanko me sis.  InshAllah, will be fine.  Yeah weather changing ..



Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on June 22, 2018, 10:27:21 pm


Our Hijri year 1439, we're now in the tenth Islamic month of Shawwal.   Only two months left for Zil-Hajj.

I need some help with Verse 2:196 as I need to explain it to my kids.   Would be so very grateful if someone could give a tafsir of this Verse.  In the following translation, what does "gifts" mean?   The expression "And if you are in safety" is explained by Hadithists as reference to ihram.  I don't see it that way.  Then, the aspect of 10 days fasting if "gifts" cannot be found .. what might be the allusion here?   

"Perform the pilgrimage and the visit (to Makka) for Allah. And if you are prevented, then send such gifts as can be obtained with ease, and shave not your heads until the gifts have reached their destination. And whoever among you is sick or has an ailment of the head must pay a ransom of fasting or almsgiving or offering. And if you are in safety, then whosoever contents himself with the visit for the pilgrimage (shall give) such gifts as can be had with ease. And whosoever cannot find (such gifts), then a fast of three days while on the pilgrimage, and of seven when you have returned; that is, ten in all. That is for him whose folk are not present at the Inviolable Place of Worship. Observe your duty to Allah, and know that Allah is severe in punishment. "  Verse 2:196   (Translation Pickthall).




Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on June 22, 2018, 11:21:47 pm


Sure Sis Ruhi.   Let me explain as best as I can, InshAllah, by analyzing the Verse part by part.

"Perform the pilgrimage and the visit (to Makka) for Allah."

It means performance of Hajj as well as Umrah together, for the love of Allah.  This simply confirms that Hajj and Umrah can be performed together. 


"And if you are prevented, then send such gifts as can be obtained with ease, and shave not your heads until the gifts have reached their destination. And whoever among you is sick or has an ailment of the head must pay a ransom of fasting or almsgiving or offering."

"gifts" refers to sacrificing an animal - cow or goat or camel.  It means those who are stopped from visiting the Kaa'ba;  the idolaters often stopped the Muslims of Medinah from visiting the Kaa'ba in Mecca.  In such a situation, a Muslim can send the sacrifice to the Kaa'ba, and they should shave their heads after the sacrifice has reached the Kaa'ba.   If someone is not able to shave their heads because of physical illness or has a problem with the scalp or a head injury, they should either fast (I would presume fast for one day) or give charity / donation. 

Frankly Pickthall shouldn't have used the term "gifts" in his translation.  That makes it confusing as people immediately wonder what might "gifts" have to do with pilgrimage?   The Quran literally says "And if you are held back then whatever obtained with ease of the sacrificial animal."   It means to offer whatever can be obtained easily of sacrificial animals.  In this Verse of the Quran, the Arabic word mentioned for sacrificial animals is "al-hadyi."  In regular Arabic, "hadiya" means gift.  But it's an established fact coming from the Quran that during Hajj no one needs to go about sending gifts or presents of the kind one may give to each other as during social events or ceremonies.  The term al-hadyi in V. 2:196 apparently, rather certainly, refers to sacrificial animal.  That's the only aspect one needs to offer.   Alternatively, as we know, some pilgrims nowadays donate money to carry out sacrifice to organizations present at the venue of Hajj.


"And if you are in safety, .."

That is, when the situation is normal / peaceful and a person is able to visit the Kaa'ba for Hajj ..... 


"And whosoever cannot find (such gifts), then a fast of three days while on the pilgrimage, and of seven when you have returned; that is, ten in all."

During Hajj if you are unable to sacrifice an animal for some reason, then there is an alternative - fasting 3 days during Hajj and fasting another 7 days after returning home, a total of 10 fasts in lieu of inability to give a sacrifice.


"That is for him whose folk are not present at the Inviolable Place of Worship."

Again, this refers to performing Hajj and Umrah together which is allowed to those who do not live close to the Kaa'ba in Mecca.   It was initially presumed a violation to perform Hajj and `Umrah together during the same journey.  In this Verse Allah Almighty has rejected that self-imposed restriction except for those who lived within the  bounds of the Kaa'ba because it wouldn't be difficult for them to travel separately for Hajj and `Umrah.


If I've left out anything, let me know Sis.






Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on June 22, 2018, 11:54:54 pm

Big thanks dear Sis :)  perfectly clear.  Yeah, Pickthall always tries to keep it as literal as possible and that may at times convey an inaccurate concept due to grammatical and style differences of Arabic and other languages.  Thus, the term "hadyi" literally translated as 'gift' got me a bit confused.






"And whosoever cannot find (such gifts), then a fast of three days while on the pilgrimage, and of seven when you have returned; that is, ten in all."

During Hajj if you are unable to sacrifice an animal for some reason, then there is an alternative - fasting 3 days during Hajj and fasting another 7 days after returning home, a total of 10 fasts in lieu of inability to give a sacrifice.



Would this mean that this alternative is available to everyone at all times?



Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on June 23, 2018, 12:15:44 am



Heba:
During Hajj if you are unable to sacrifice an animal for some reason, then there is an alternative - fasting 3 days during Hajj and fasting another 7 days after returning home, a total of 10 fasts in lieu of inability to give a sacrifice.

Ruhi:
Would this mean that this alternative is available to everyone at all times?


That's a thoughtful question.  Let's read this portion of the Verse 2:196 again: 

"And if you are in safety, then whosoever contents himself with the visit for the pilgrimage (shall give) such gifts as can be had with ease. And whosoever cannot find (such gifts), then a fast of three days while on the pilgrimage, and of seven when you have returned; that is, ten in all."


In my opinion, in accordance with the flow and fluency of the Verse, it does include all times but only if sacrificial animals are not available.  Back in those days with lesser trade and lesser money in the Arabian peninsula, animals consumed for Halal food were not too easily available.  So there could be times when sacrificial animals wouldn't be found during pilgrimage.  However, in modern times and in a normal atmosphere one may never face such a situation.  It may only happen in turbulent times as during wars or natural disasters etc. which hasn't happened lately around the premises of Hejaz.  I suppose that's the reason we never hear of anyone utilizing this alternative.   




Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on June 23, 2018, 12:21:50 am


Aha, I get it. 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on June 23, 2018, 03:09:10 am

Thank you Sister Heba.  That was nicely explicated. 

Another point.  Some Quran-aloners are arguing that shaving of the head should be done by both men and women.  According to their grasp, since the Quran does not specify in so many words that only men must shave their heads and not women, they prefer to presume both must shave their heads.   

What's your perspective?



 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Ruhi_Rose on June 23, 2018, 03:25:01 am


Some time ago I saw someone at FMs arguing on this point.  I think that's because  folks at FMs do not accept head-covering or hijab as a Quranic injunction on women's dress code. 


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on June 23, 2018, 03:26:07 am


That makes sense.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Zeynab on June 24, 2018, 11:57:50 pm
   ........

Another point.  Some Quran-aloners are arguing that shaving of the head should be done by both men and women.  According to their grasp, since the Quran does not specify in so many words that only men must shave their heads and not women, they prefer to presume both must shave their heads.  

What's your perspective? 


Well yes, I admit the Quran does not specifically prohibit women from shaving their heads after completing Hajj, but logically I don't agree with the view point of those guys.  Shaving the head is a Divine Instruction for a practical reason and not a spiritual reason, that is, to end one's unkempt appearance (refer Verse 22:29) and mark a new beginning.  Indeed, completion of Hajj is a new beginning for women as well.   But there are some social aspects to be considered that may not  necessitate shaving of the head for women as the final ritual of Hajj.  In the earlier eras of history, women were far less outdoor than men and therefore generally, women of all social classes avoided the state of unkemptness to a much greater degree than men.   Secondly, unlike men, long hair is a part of a woman's personality which isn't supposed to symbolize a scruffy appearance.  Thirdly, as Sister Ruhi hinted, women are required to keep their hair covered in public and in the presence of non-mehrem males in accordance with the Quranic dress code. (http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=2274.0)  Thus again, the aspect of unkemptness doesn't arise in the case of women.

Considering these factors, if it was still necessary for women to shave their heads as men, we can be quite certain that The Almighty would mention it instead of leaving us to presume on account of the absence of such an instruction from Him.  Though only Allah knows best, in my opinion He has not specified it because it isn't obligatory for women to act upon this ritual.

Some years ago we had taken up for discussion the expression "shaven and cut" in Verse 48:27. (http://muslimvilla.smfforfree.com/index.php?topic=1087.0)   The traditionalists take this Verse to assume that men need to shave their heads while women are to cut it a wee bit shorter;  the length shortened may depend upon individual decision.   But the point is that there is no evidence that the expression "cut" in Verse 48:27 indicates the trimming or cutting of the hair of female pilgrims.   As usual, traditionalist sources have dozens of different opinions on the length of the hair to be cut, ranging from a fingertip to a few inches, but without any evidence from the Quran.

To conclude, since the Quran does not specifically state that shaving of the head at the completion of Hajj must be done by women as well, I don't think it's a requirement or certainly not an important issue, unless one personally wants to symbolically trim an inch or two of her hair.  There's no harm in that either.




Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on June 25, 2018, 11:55:50 pm

Many thanks Sister Zeynab.  That sounds comprehensive and rational.  My family and I were discussing this at dinner last night and we too had very similar thoughts.


Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: Heba E. Husseyn on June 27, 2018, 12:00:45 am


The amusing similarity between free minders and hadithists that cannot go unnoticed is their limited focus, taking every issue dot at face value without the slightest of contemplation over general Quranic facts & principles .... without the slightest use of common sense.  Why would a woman need to do anything to her hair when she's supposed to keep her hair neatly tied or rolled up beneath a full hejab regardless of its length?  And yes, long hair is a part of a female's personality.  It doesn't mean the same for men.   

At present female head shaving in the ever-growing crazy west has become a pop culture.  That repellent fatty, Britney Spears, shaved her head a decade ago when everyone thought she officially turned a lunatic;  that's how it got started and since then many female hollywooders did the same for one stupid reason or another.  It can be viewed as one of the deviant tantrums of feminists to challenge the western culture in which shaving heads has been traditionally considered ultra masculine for men .. as the conservative skinheads do.  In medieval era, in fact up to the period of WW2, shaving a woman's head was often done as a punishment for some violation. 

By the way, needless to say, the Quranic instruction of shaving heads apparently for men only has nothing to do with any such ideas of masculinity nor punishment.  It's simply a gesture to tidy up oneself after completing Hajj, a gesture not required for women because of the vastly differing grooming methods of both genders. 

Thank you Sisters Zeynab, Ruhi, Br. TS.    Allah Almighty bless.




Title: Re: What does the Quran say about Hajj?
Post by: N. Truth Seeker on June 27, 2018, 12:35:29 am

   .......  

At present female head shaving in the ever-growing crazy west has become a pop culture.  That repellent fatty, Britney Spears, shaved her head a decade ago when everyone thought she officially turned a lunatic;  that's how it got started and since then many female hollywooders did the same for one stupid reason or another.  It can be viewed as one of the deviant tantrums of feminists to challenge the western culture in which shaving heads has been traditionally considered ultra masculine for men .. as the conservative skinheads do.  ................ 
.........

That could be the reason why a few so-called progressives at FMs brought up this argument.   Many of them do nurture such a perspective; their own "style" of distorting Islam does often go along such lines.  I've observed that concerning various issues time and again. 

Thanks a lot Sister Heba.